Converting non-believers: How investing in learning pays off

June 11, 2020 Alicia Roy

So much content is out there about getting your workplace to invest in learning, but quite often, it’s not that your employees don’t want to learn and more so that you are struggling to convince your top level management that training initiatives are worth the investment. Training can be an expensive investment, convincing them to sign off the budget could be the biggest obstacle to creating a continuous learning culture, but here are some points that might just change their minds.

Learning creates a more engaged workforce

Ensuring employees are engaged is key to enabling a driven and motivated workforce and investing in learning is the first step. Continuous and personalised learning will help employees feel that they are a valued member of the workforce. This can also help to push them to define their career paths and reach their goals faster.

Encouraging employees to direct their own progression can help them to understand the value they bring to the workforce; it forces them out of the box of familiarity and enables them to expand their knowledge and skill base. A third of employees who quit their jobs do so because they haven’t learnt new skills with lack of career growth being one of the reasons workers leave, according to a recent study. When employees feel trapped in roles, they will begin to look elsewhere, but with continuous learning, employees will feel more engaged which will push up staff retention rates.

Learning equals productivity increase

Many will see a lift in productivity from monitoring and tracking training. Your workforce will feel compelled to get involved with training which can encourage harder and smarter ways of working. By also incentivising learning, this makes it feel like less of a chore, and more of a want. When training doesn't feel forced, employees learn quicker and feel more connected to the things they are learning. 

Almost half of employees feel that the number one reason they are bored at work is due to the lack of opportunity to learn. By simultaneously learning and working, employees can improve their productivity levels, problem solving skills and even enhance knowledge sharing. Furthermore, technology can contribute to this by finding and suggesting learning that focuses on each employee’s individual skills, experiences and career aspirations.

Learning reduces stress

Allocated learning time can help to gain distance from difficult tasks allowing employees to feel refreshed when returning while allowing for a break from “normal” work. Because training can be tailored to each individual, this means that the time they spend learning needn't interfere with “work time”. In fact, those who work for companies who invest in learning resources are 83% more likely to feel happier in their role, according to a report by Ceridian.

Many employees, now more than ever, could be suffering with screen fatigue. By setting training that must be completed on a tablet or mobile can help as it forces employees to step away from their traditional screen. To take this even further, you could instruct employees to do this training in a new environment such as a garden or park if those are available. 

Learning means you stay relevant 

Commitment to continuous training helps your employees stand the test of time. One in five of the skills we learn today are likely to be obsolete in just three years. Learning continuously will help. 

This also keeps staff knowledge up to date to help them to compete with the ever-changing times. By enabling employees to both improve their existing skills and learning new ones, you can ensure that they are future proofing themselves. 

Some managers may fear that employees will take these skills to other organisations, but what if they stay without the skills? Showing genuine care for your employees will help to retain them and with continuous training, they will remain at the top of their game.

About the Author

Alicia Roy

With a background in recruitment, Alicia is currently part of the marketing team and helps creating new content as well as building the online brand as a community manager.

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